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Herb Spotlight - Chamomile

Herb Spotlight - Motherwort - Sun God Medicinals

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita)  

Family: Asteraceae

Part Used: Flowering tops

Flavor/Aroma: Bitter, Sweet

Energetics: Neutral


Herbal Actions: 

Antispasmodic, Carminative, Vularnary, Nervine, Sedative, Vermifuge, Emetic, Antipruritic, Digestive bitter, Anti inflammatory, Anticatarrhal, Anti Nausea

Overview:

Chamomile is best known for its sweet and floral flavor in teas, and its ability to soothe stomach aches and provide gentle calming effects. Its uses have dated back to ancient Egyptian times, and was also commonly used throughout the European nations as a common medicine.  

Botany:

Chamomile grows as an aromatic, herbaceous plant that grows white daisy-like flowers. The scent of the fresh blooms are reminiscent of sweet apples and melons. Chamomile grows as a perennial herb that is native to Europe and Western Asia.

Cultivation and Harvesting:

Chamomile is best harvested just as the flowering tops begin to open, and are not fully expressed. It is naturalized in many places globally, and has been grown for medicinal and ornamental purposes.

Southern Oregon Cultivation:

Chamomile species are regularly found in wild areas in Southern Oregon, from dry hillsides to rocky shore lines. Most species found in this region have interchangeable medicinal uses. It is easily cultivated in gardens, and its flowers provides local pollinators with nutritious sustenance. Always use your best practices when harvesting, or better yet, start your very own tea garden, incorporating Chamomile, and add to the ecological diversity of this landscape.

History and Folklore:

American Native Uses: Chamomile was used to alleviate flatulence, gastric discomfort, and anxiety patterns. It has been used for nervous t, an overactive mind, and as a general anti inflammatory for a variety of conditions both internally and externally.¹

Cherokee tribes referred to Chamomile as the tea for “regularity”. 

Other Traditional Uses: Chamomile, also known as Manzinilla, has been used by tribes of Mexico for respiratory health, soothing stomach discomfort, and lifting the mood. Chamomile has also been revered for its magical ability to bring about luck and money.

Modern Applications:

Chamomile has been indicated to support a wide variety of gastrointestinal issues including bloating, diarrhea², ulcers, and pain associated with gas. It is used to remedy kidney stones, eczema, psoriasis, sore throats, and for bacterial infections of the mouth and skin. Chamomile has anti-inflammatory and wound healing abilities that can support irritated tissues throughout all the body systems, as well as enhance moods and support depressed or anxious states of mind.³

Uses and Preparations:

Dried Herb Tea Preparation: 

1 Tablespoon of fresh flowers per cup of water, allowing it to infuse for 5-10 minutes before consuming.

Using a reusable tea bag or tea ball, immerse the loose dried herbs into boiling water and allow to steep for 5-10 minutes, preferably covered, in order to release the maximum amount of herbal goodness. Some herbal tea can carry a strong flavor. We recommend organic honey as a sweetener which preserves the beneficial herbal compounds. 

Tincture: 

2-4 mL up to four times per day.

Some herbal tinctures can have a strong flavor on their own. Adding your tincture to a glass of 6-8oz of water is one easy way to help, should you wish to dilute the flavor.  

Dosage:

It is important to remember that some bodies may react differently than others when using herbal products. Our recommended dosages are designed to be an average dosage only. If you have specific concerns about the dosage amount or interaction with other medication, please consult with your doctor or health care practitioner prior to using our products.  

Precautions:

Those with allergies to the Asteraceae family may want to exercise precaution when using any medicinal herbs of that family. We recommend consulting with a professional before using during pregnancy, nursing, or with any other medications.

References:

  1. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://cms.herbalgram.org/expandedE/ChamomileflowerGerman.html 
  2. Mehmood, M. H., Munir, S., Khalid, U. A., Asrar, M., & Gilani, A. H. (2015, March, 24). Antidiarrheal, antisecretory and antispasmodic activities of matricaria chamomilla are mediated predominantly through K channels activation. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4410481/ 
  3. Matricaria (n.d.). www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/kings/matricaria.html

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.